Home > Greek Lore, Public Art, and a Colossal 46-Foot Tall Head

Greek Lore, Public Art, and a Colossal 46-Foot Tall Head

Echo, a 46-foot tall sculpture created by renowned public space artist Jaume Plensa, has found its new home in Seattle’s Olympic Sculpture Park. Plensa imagined Echo positioned looking out into the Puget Sound, in the direction of Mount Olympus, which pays homage to the sculpture’s Greek mythological roots.

In Greek Mythology, Echo, a very loquacious mountain nymph, would distract Zeus’s wife, Hera, while he partook in discrete extramarital activities with other nymphs. Upon finding out, Hera punished Echo, depriving her of speech except for thoughtlessly repeating the last words of another. By sculpting Echo, Plensa applies such lore to modern day society as he hopes to create a reaction in onlookers, which guides them to stop and think for themselves, rather than merely reciting others.

To sculpt Echo, Plensa digitally exaggerated and altered the features of a 9-year old daughter of a restaurant owner near his studio in Barcelona. The sculpture is crafted out of resin, steel and marble dust.

Jaume Plensa’s work is showcased all across the globe and he is known for his contemplative works of art. Echo will be traveling to Seattle’s Olympic Sculpture Park from Madison Square Park in New York.  Olympic Sculpture Park is nine-acre green space for art and is located on the waterfront. The park is open to the public year round free of charge. For more information visit seattleartmuseum.org.

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